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Lincoln University president discusses vision for the future


Lincoln University President Dr. John Moseley discussed his vision for the Historically Black College and University Thursday night at the Missouri River Regional Library. (KRCG/Jessica)
Lincoln University President Dr. John Moseley discussed his vision for the Historically Black College and University Thursday night at the Missouri River Regional Library. (KRCG/Jessica)
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Lincoln University President Dr. John Moseley discussed his vision for the Historically Black College and University Thursday night at the Missouri River Regional Library.

Moseley said he would like to see LU become a first-choice institution and not a last resort, and he has a few ideas to make this happen.

He noted Lincoln's retention rate on average is between 51-52 percent, which is a percentage he would like to improve. The university already offers scholarships to incoming students based on their high school GPA and their ACT or SAT scores.

"Almost 78 percent of the students that have declared their intent to enroll at the university next year that are first-time freshman have qualified from one of these [scholarships ranging] from $500 to $3,250," Moseley said.

Dr. Moseley noted he would like to create an incentive program to keep students motivated.

"I would like to have a retention incentive, so when these freshmen come in, and they do really well, can we just give them a $250 dollar scholarship the next semester, just to keep them motivated? Can we do that if underprepared students come in and they get a 2.5 [GPA] can, we give them something to keep them motivated," Dr. Moseley said.

As the Missouri legislature continues with the budget process, Moseley noted Lincoln has asked for $40 million to double the nursing program.

Our nursing program is among the top in the state.
This would give us the opportunity to potentially double the number of nursing majors that we have.

He noted the project would all for this new building to house their life sciences courses such as physics, biology, and chemistry with lab spaces.

The $40 million project would also create a crisis center.

"The concept is a security sciences institute. It allows for degree add-ons and certificate programs, cybersecurity, law enforcement, emergency management, geo-spatial informational services, and criminal justice," he said.

Moseley said the building would tie into Elliff Hall on Lafayette Street.

"One of the coolest features inside of it is going to be an emergency operating training center," he said. "This concept of a bunker for natural disasters or emergencies where everybody sits and there and starts planning for what happens next... allegedly there is no place for these individuals to train, they get thrown into the bunker at the time of the emergency. It would not only benefit our students, but we believe agencies throughout the Midwest would come here to train.

He also wants to bring late-night food options to campus for students who have evening classes or are hungry after hours. Additionally, he is interested in developing a coffee shop on or near campus to give students another place to study or relax between classes.

Moseley added the university is also looking to renovate one of the campus housing facilities to create more one-bedroom housing options.

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He said he is also looking for ways to improve the faculty experience. One idea would be to transition to a four-day workweek while remaining open five days a week. Moseley said it is just an idea that would allow faculty to have a three-day weekend. Faculty would work 10 hours a day, four days a week.

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