68
      Saturday
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      Sunday
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      Monday
      89 / 67

      Farmer Avoids Drought Conditions

      Dry conditions have hurt corn and soybean yields as most Missouri farmers begin their fall harvests.

      Dry conditions have hurt corn and soybean yields as most Missouri farmers begin their fall harvests.

      Drought conditions in central Missouri are moderate and become more extreme as you go north.

      Terry Hilgedick has been a Hartsburg farmer for more than 30 years. His farm sits along the Missouri River which seemed to be the right place for him.

      Hilgedick said, ??We were kind of right on the edge of it. It seems like its drier north of here. Of course, the south had a lot of flooding through the summer. We were able to catch a little bit of that rain that went to the south.??

      Hilgedick said that made a huge difference for his crop of corn and soybeans. He knows just how unpredictable Mother Nature can be. He??s had enough rain in the river bottoms of Hartsburg, but just a few miles north, it??s been 10 times drier. National Weather Service statistics show Columbia is about 7 inches below normal since the beginning of summer. University of Missouri Extenstion Agronomy Specialist Bill Wiebold said this year??s drought is not getting much attention because of this summer??s cooler temperatures.

      Wiebold said, ??It kind of snuck up on us. Our soybean and corn yields will be below trend lines. That??s actually happened for the fourth year in a row. It??s kind of an unusual spell of dry weather.??

      Farmers don??t mind the dry conditions as they harvest their corn and soybeans. Missouri farmers will plant wheat during the first weeks of October and that??s when they??ll once again pray for rain.

      Wiebold said August was the driest month in Northern Missouri during the past 3 decades.