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      Engineers blame deteriorated concrete for walkway collapse

      Inspection reports show University Officials knew for years significant repairs needed to be made at University Village Apartments.

      Documents show engineers blame concrete deterioration for an apartment walkway collapse that killed a Columbia fireman.

      Lt. Bruce Britt was killed 2 weeks ago while responding to a call at Mizzouâ??s University Village Apartments.

      Inspection reports show University Officials knew for years significant repairs needed to be made.

      According to documents obtained by KRCG 13, engineers said the support beams, metal deck and concrete slab of the walkway were â??significantly deterioratedâ?? the morning Britt was killed. The report by Trabue, Hansen and Hinshaw shows the apartments have structural problems with the exception of 2 buildings. Katherine Brewster moved into University Village in January and said University Officials should have made repairs a long time ago.

      Brewster said, â??Obviously, they are that bad because they are repairing them right now. They should have been looking into that. There are families living here. If I had kids, I would not be staying for sure.â??

      Crews built wooden supports under all of the walkways at University Village after last monthâ??s collapse. The inspection reports show 3 walkways remain questionable. Inspectors said if repairs are not immediately made on those walkways, there could be another catastrophic collapse. Documents show University Officials knew about the structural problems as early as 2007.

      MU spokesman Christian Basi said, â??We consulted with engineers, they told us if they had been at the site a week before the collapse, they could have not predicted the failure. We have regularly inspected the walkways on a yearly basis for the past 4 years. As a result of those inspections, we made structural improvements to the walkways by installing metal supports.â??

      Some temporary repairs were made, but they never approved more than $15 million in renovations recommended by architects.