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      Quin to win?

      They call what we do news because it's supposed to be "new."

      Okay, this news is three days old.

      But when you consider the history of time and the universe, it's still fairly new.

      Quin Snyder has been named head coach of the NBA's Utah Jazz.

      Huh? Really? Quin to win?

      This has taken a few days to digest.

      If you don't know who Quin Snyder is, here is a basic timeline of his 47 years on Earth in two sentences:

      Born in the state of Washington, Snyder played point guard at Duke from 1985-89, he has worked as an assistant coach at both Duke and several NBA teams, was head coach of an NBA developmental team, the Austin Toros, and head coach of the Euroleague's PBC CSKA Moscow team for the 2012-13 season.

      And he was head coach of the Missouri Tigers from 1999-2006, replacing Norm Stewart.

      I will lean on a friend who knows a lot more about sports than I do, Will Palaszczuk, former host of the KTGR Big Show and now headed for the bigger waters of the Yahoo Sports Radio national network.

      "I think Quin is judged more from his time at Missouri at the way it ended and by his faults, more so than how good of a coach he is,"ã??Palaszczuk said. "Maybe he was the wrong coach at the wrong time, but he was always living in the shadow of Norm.

      "That's not necessarily the fairest way to judge him."

      The good Quin.ã??In 2002, as a No. 12 seed in the NCAA Tournament, the Tigers beat Miami, Fla., Ohio State, and UCLA, before losing by six to Oklahoma in the Elite Eight.

      "The fact he was able to do that, that's a very worthy accomplishment and it shows you what kind of coach he is,"ã??Palaszczukã??said.

      The bad Quin. His "dealings" with Ricky Clemons, the NCAA violations, the alleged drug use. He was fired late in the 2006 season, even though the university said he resigned.

      "There is no doubt I was fired," Snyder told the Columbia Tribune in 2010. "I don't even like the idea of resigning. It's like quitting.

      "Most of us, if we're put on a pedestal, we're going to fall, because it's not real. I was called the smartest guy in the gym, and I never thought that about myself."

      Now, the smartest guy in the gym is a head coach in the NBA.

      "I don't think anybody disputes how smart he is when it comes to basketball,"ã??Palaszczukã??said. "I just think he had some problems, personally, with the NCAA and being a college coach. In the NBA, you don't have to deal with the whims of the NCAA, you can just focus on coaching basketball.

      "I don't think anybody doubts his ability in that area, it was all the other stuff. I think his style of doing things probably fits a lot better in the NBA than it does in the college game."

      Quin to win?

      We'll see.