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      New plans for Jefferson City High School

      Secondary education in the Capital City has been the topic of many conversations for several months now. And earlier this week, the Board of Education held a special work session to further discuss facility options for the high school.The district wants to take the schools into the 21st Century, giving students every opportunity for success that they can. Making sure students are able to compete with the best in the country, attend the most prestigious universities and land successful careers are all part of that goal.However, parents and school officials are concerned about overcrowding at the current high school and the increasing class sizes to come.The district came up with three main options to fix the issue.Option A would have several buildings, including the current Jefferson City High School, Nichols Career Center, Thorpe Gordon Elementary and a new facility all serve students in the same general area at an estimated cost of $41-45 million.Option B is a single high school campus that would combine Jefferson City High School, Nichols Career Center and Thorpe Gordon Elementary under one room which would cost an estimated $54 million.Option C proposes the district renovate the current high school and build a second high school, giving Jefferson City two public high schools at an estimated $67 million.But now, the district has a fourth option on the table. They are calling it Alternative B.Which is finding another purpose for our current high school facility and finding a piece of property that is condusive to the needs we have now and well into the future and build a brand new high school that would serve all of our kids, Superintendent Brian Mitchell said.Alternative B could cost $55-57 million. It's the alternative Mitchell thinks is best for the district.He says having two high schools in the Capital City would only put a division in the tight knit community.A second high school is going to immediately create a sense of inequality because half of our kids are going to enjoy a brand new facility with the amenities inside and out that we would want for all of our kids and yet half our kids, even though we would renovate it to the very best of our abilities, it's still going to be in a setting that's limited, Mitchell said.Parents agree.We do have a small community and a lot of pride in our school, so I think that having two schools would separate those students and it would bring a lot of rivalry that we don't need, Michelle Horn said.The district is making more than just changes to the brick and mortar. It has adopted an entirely new learning structure called project-based learning.It allows students to learn from experiences and apply them to life outside the classroom.It's all about making sure that all of our students get all of the opportunities that Jefferson City Public Schools offers us, Parent Brenda Hatfield said. All that rich curriculum, all those AP courses, Nichols Career Center, everything that makes Jefferson City such a wonderful district to live in.It's a very, very exciting future for our students and for our teachers, Horn said.Parents say things will only get better from here.Preview story:Secondary education in the capitol city has been the topic of many conversations for several months now.

      And earlier this week the Jefferson City School Board held a special work session to further discuss facility options for the high school.

      The district wants to take the schools into the 21st century, giving students every opportunity for success that they can.

      Officials say they want to make sure students are able to compete with the best in the country, attend the most prestigious universities and land successful careers.

      However, parents, as well as school officials, are concerned about overcrowding at the current high school and the increasing class sizes to come.

      Tonight at ten, KRCG TMs Meghan Lane talks with school officials and parents to find out what actions have been taken and what residents can expect in the future.

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