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      Familes of missing get help

      Marianne Asher-Chapmanâ??s daughter, Angie Yarnell, went missing from her home in Ivy Bend in October 2003.

      After a decade of searching, the discovery of three missing women in Cleveland, Ohio is giving hope to families here in mid-Missouri.

      Marianne Asher-Chapman??s daughter, Angie Yarnell, went missing from her home in Ivy Bend in October 2003. After more than five years, Angie??s husband, Michael Yarnell, admitted to investigators that he was guilty of Angie??s death and was sentenced to a seven-year prison term for involuntary manslaughter. At the time of her disappearance, Angie was only 28 years old. It has now been more than nine years and Marianne said the pain of losing her daughter remains fresh in her heart and her mind at all times.

      Marianne Asher-Chapman said, ??I don??t have a body. I have nothing tangible. It??s kind of like she is not dead and she is not alive. She is just gone. She??s gone, vanished.??

      Marianne lives in Holts Summit and belongs to a group called Missouri Missing. The organization provides a voice for missing people who can no longer speak for themselves.Asher-Chapman said, ??We just do what we can to try to help. Hopefully, we are helping.??

      Missouri Missing works closely with the Missouri State Highway Patrol??s Missing Persons Unit. What happened in Cleveland gives them all new found hope. According to the Missouri Highway Patrol Missing Persons Unit, on any given day there are more than 1,000 adults, juveniles, and children missing in the State of Missouri alone.