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      A community washed away

      For decades flood waters submerged the small town of Cedar City, each time its residents moved back and picked up the pieces.But in 1993 the great flood would ultimately claim the community.In Thursday TMs Facebook story of the day, KRCG's Meghan Lane took a look back at what Cedar City use to be and what it looks like today.When the Missouri River leaped out of its banks in '93 it didn't care if your crops were growing, if you just put a new roof on your house or if your business was booming.The raging river was ruthless. KRCG TMs morning anchor Dick Preston reported on the 1993 flooding."I remember coming home right before the levee gave way and water was already seeping through the levee and filling up a lot of the yards in cedar city, I was in a carpool and as the two of us came home, you could see somebody had a car in cedar city with their headlights on and they were pulling fish out and putting them in a sack," Preston said. "That was pretty incredible."Cedar City was nearly washed away by the unforgiving floods.KRCG's Dick Preston reported on the historic event."I remember one interview we had with a woman who had just moved there, she wasn't familiar with the area and she had just fixed up this house, it was over by the airport and she was saying, ~I hope the water doesn't come up high enough that it gets into the living room, TM Preston said. That house was basically destroyed, that was really sad."In the last year Missouri has seen its fair share of natural disasters.Preston said sights in Joplin are all too familiar."It was just an incredible scene, Preston said. It wasn't anything like Joplin, but in a way it was because you just couldn't believe your eyes you knew what had been there and now it wasn't there anymore."Now soccer and baseball fields, a pavilion and playgrounds are where quaint homes and profitable farmland use to be.After the 93 flood, Federal Emergency Management Agency Funding and Community Development block grants, bought out business and residential holdings in Cedar City.The Jefferson City council designated the 165 acres as park land.