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      Missouri prosecutors gain new legal protections

      Missouri prosecutors advising police on undercover investigations now have greater legal protection that their conduct won't violate ethical rules.

      Missouri prosecutors advising police on undercover investigations now have greater legal protection that their conduct won't violate ethical rules.

      A recent change to the Missouri Supreme Court's Rules of Professional Conduct explicitly allows government lawyers to collaborate on undercover operations without risking sanction for professional misconduct.

      The amendment further codifies a tactic that former Cape Girardeau County prosecutor Morley Swingle calls "the oldest trick in the criminal investigator's book" -- lying to a suspect to help solve a case. Swingle is now an assistant U.S. attorney.

      Missouri is among 10 states to make similar revisions to its conduct codes for lawyers. Many came in response to a Colorado case in which a prosecutor's law license was suspended after he posed as a public defender to elicit a murder confession.