43 / 34
      40 / 33
      43 / 32

      Capitol Hill all 'a-twitter' over Weiner twitter scandal

      Rep. Anthony Weiner is under-fire on Capitol Hill for a twitter scandal involving sending lewd photos to several women.Missouri TMs Senators Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt agree Congressman Weiner goofed, but say social media is not to blame for the mistake. Rep. Weiner, (D) New York, has vowed to remain in office despite mounting pressure for him to resign after he admitted to sending lewd pictures to at least six women over the Internet.Both Senators Blunt and McCaskill say Weiner is the problem, not Facebook and Twitter. The problem here has nothing to do with social media, Sen. McCaskill, (D) Mo, told KRCG in a satellite interview. The problem with Congressman Weiner is a personal problem with Congressman Weiner. McCaskill is one of Capitol Hill TMs heaviest users of social media with more than 55,000 Twitter followers and writes all of her tweets. She says the Weiner scandal has not caused her to rethink her online presence. That TMs just the method he used to be inappropriate and that TMs not the problem, the problem is him, McCaskill said. It has nothing to do with whether or not he is using emails or texts or phone calls, inappropriate behavior lies right at his feet.At least a half-dozen of Weiner TMs fellow House Democrats have publicly called on him to resign and others are distancing themselves from the one-time rising star who was expected to be the front-runner in the New York City mayoral race.When asked by KRCG if Weiner should resign McCaskill said she would not comment directly but went on to say: "I think it TMs obvious to everyone that Congressman Weiner has issues and obviously something very wrong with the way he views the world and I think that speaks for itself."Sen. Roy Blunt, (R) Mo, has also stayed out of the speculation over whether or not Weiner should resign.He lets his staff members manage his Twitter and Facebook accounts but told the MissouriNet he believes social media has an increasingly large role in politics as more people become comfortable enough with the medium to use it to contact their elected officials. He was the first GOP Senator to include both his twitter and Facebook accounts on his business card.Blunt says he hopes the Weiner Scandal doesn't stop lawmakers from using social media. "I think it's important to use the social media," Blunt told reporters in a phone call quoted by St. Louis Beacon . "We're trying to use that in a way that really makes people comfortable in communicating with our office in whatever way they think is best to do it.", a website run by conservative activist Andrew Breitbart, first revealed on May. 28th a lewd photo of bulging underwear sent from Weiner's Twitter account.Weiner, 46, first lied about sending the sexually charged picture until the website published more pictures including one of a shirtless man that was sent to a another woman. In a Monday afternoon press conference, Weiner confessed to the scandal and apologized , but refused to resign.House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi promptly requested a House ethics panel probe of Weiner noting that Weiner had "disclosed conduct that he described as inappropriate." Weiner said he welcomes and will fully cooperate with an ethics committee investigation.Since his confession, more explicit photos have been released on the internet, including an X-rated picture that Weiner's office confirms are of the congressman.Weiner has been married to Huma Abedin for less than one year.Abedin, who is pregnant, works for the State Department where she is a top aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. She was also an intern for Clinton in 1996, helping the then-first lady through the public spectacle over her husband's affair with Monica Lewinsky.One friend and State Department colleague says Abedin is "a very strong woman."What do you think, should lawmakers continue using Twitter and Facebook to communicate with their constituents? Should Rep. Weiner resign? Let us know by leaving a message below.(The Associated Press contributed to this story)