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Crop circles pop up in time for solar eclipse

Jay and Kim Fischer created a design of crop circles in their corn maze for the Solar Eclipse. (KRCG 13)

Thousands of people will converge on mid-Missouri later in August.

They'll be there to watch history, something many people only see once in their lifetime, something the state of Missouri hasn't seen since 1869 - a total solar eclipse.

One couple in Jefferson City got in on the excitement.

As drivers cross over the bridge into Jefferson City on Highway 54, they might have noticed a corn field near the Noren Access.

A closer look and one can see crop circles designed.

"It took us probably about 60 days to come up with it from start to finish from the time we started talking about it," Jay Fischer said.

Fischer Farms in Callaway County has been quite busy in the fall for their pumpkins and their corn maze.

This year owners Jay and Kim Fischer had a new addition, one specifically catered to August 21, 2017.

"It's actual crop circles in the maze this year for the eclipse," Kim Fischer said.

The Fischers said their crop was full of the same kind of corn farmers use to feed animals or use for ethanol.

The only difference with their corn field was they cross planted it.

"A regular farm, a regular field, you just plant one way, this way you had to cross plant it," Kim Fischer said. "You go one way then you crisscross over it so people can't actually see down the row."

They said they were excited for the influx of people coming into the Capital City and hopefully to the solar eclipse corn maze.

"I am pretty excited," Jay Fischer said. "I can't imagine more people coming to this city than what actually lives here. That's pretty amazing to me and i'm curious as to where all of these people are going to be at."

The Fischer's corn maze is scheduled to be open Saturday, August 19 from 6-9 p.m., Sunday, August 20 from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and then on the day of the Eclipse, Monday, August 21 from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The mid-day darkness will begin at 11:45 a.m. The prime viewing of the total eclipse will occur for two and a half minutes between 1:12 and 1:15 p.m.

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