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Inspector General reviewing FBI and DOJ over Hillary Clinton probes

WASHINGTON (Sincair Broadcast Group) - The Department of Justice Inspector General (OIG) has announced a review of the FBI and Department of Justice (DOJ) over the handling of the email server investigation of Hillary Clinton.

Michael E. Horowitz announced the investigation was in response to a number of requests from high-ranking members of Congressional oversight committees.

According to a release, the OIG will look into allegations that FBI procedures weren't followed with regard to FBI Director James Comey's July 2016 announcement that he was not recommending charges against Clinton for her handling of classified information and whether "underlying investigative decisions were based on improper considerations."

The investigation will include letters Comey sent to members of Congress on October 28 and November 6 about the discovery of additional emails that ultimately did not impact the FBI's charging decision. Democrats have alleged that his actions breached DOJ policies by releasing that information so close to the election, potentially influencing the results.

The OIG will also look at whether an FBI deputy director should have been recused from participating in some investigative matters, and whether the assistant attorney general for legislative affairs released non-public information to the Clinton campaign.

Months before he took on a role in the investigation, the wife of Deputy Director Andrew McCabe received large donations for her Virginia State Senate campaign from a super PAC connected with a prominent Clinton ally. Hacked emails released by WikiLeaks showed an assistant attorney general communicated with campaign aides about hearing dates and other information that may have been available to the public.

Other allegations include whether DOJ and FBI employees were improperly given non-public information, and the timing of the FBI's posting of Freedom of Information Act documents on Twitter in October and November. A week before the election, documents pertaining to a 2001 investigation of Bill Clinton were tweeted out from an account that had been dormant for months.

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